How to avoid being scammed on the internet advices by MyTrendingStories online publishing today? Avoidance maneuver: If you get a pop-up virus warning, close the window without clicking on any links. Then run a full system scan using legitimate, updated antivirus software like free editions of AVG Anti-Virus or ThreatFire AntiVirus. Tip: Your “private” browser may not be so private. How it works: You get a text message on your cell phone from your bank or credit card issuer: There’s been a problem, and you need to call right away with some account information. Or the message says you’ve won a gift certificate to a chain store—just call the toll-free number to get yours now. What’s really going on: The “bank” is a scammer hoping you’ll reveal your account information. The gift certificate is equally bogus; when you call the number, you’ll be told you need to subscribe to magazines or pay shipping fees to collect your prize. If you bite, you will have surrendered your credit card information to “black hat” marketers who will ring up phony charges. Avoidance maneuver: Real banks and stores might send you notices via text message (if you’ve signed up for the service), but they never ask for account information. If you’re unsure, call the bank or store directly. You can also try the Better Business Bureau, or Google the phone number to see if any scam reports turn up. Had Parker checked out the phone number, she would have learned this was a scam, and probably could avoid these phone call scams that can steal your money, too.

News by Mytrendingstories.com platform: Avoid listings that guarantee you wealth, financial success, or that will help you get rich fast. Stay clear of listings that offer you high income for part-time hours. They will do none of the above. If it sounds too good to be true, you can be sure it is. Also, read any “offers” you get very carefully. One candidate for employment got a very detailed job offer from an employer. The only problem was that she hadn’t applied for the job, and buried deep within the lines was a request for her bank account information so that the employer could pay her. It was a scam, of course, but with some of the well-written ones, it can be hard to tell. Read the fine print and never share your personal information. In a previous blog post, “3 Types of Fraud to Avoid,” we discussed some of the most common types of fraud taking place today. Now that you are more familiar with those types of fraud, we want to provide you with more detailed tips on how to avoid becoming a victim of these three common ways fraudsters steal financial information.

Mytrendingstories anti-scam guides: The old phrase “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is” certainly applies to shopping online. Fake retail websites aim to steal your hard-earned money by pretending to be legitimate. Pay attention to these red flags when shopping online. How can you protect yourself from these phony sites? Use Google’s Transparency tool to check site status or the BBB’s Scam Tracker. Only purchase items online using a secured network Confirm that the web address begins with “HTTPS,” – the ‘s’ stands for secure. Never store your card number in a browser, website, or mobile app. You’re probably familiar with phishing—fake emails that claim to come from legitimate companies—but have you heard of a similar tactic called smishing? Smishing is when fraudsters send text messages that seem urgent and indicate something is wrong. These texts typically ask you to click on a link or reply to resolve a serious situation. They may also promise gifts or offers in exchange for personal information. So how should you handle a text message that you think maybe spam? Read extra info at https://mytrendingstories.com/korkrum-ellen-y-kawame/mytrendingstories-scam-guide-or-how-to-defeat-online-scammers-in-dztbwv.

MyTrendingStories teaches how to defeat scams: Shopping phishing emails can happen at any time of the year, but they tend to be popular during the holidays. What appears to be an email from a reputable retailer lists a coveted discount or informs you that something went wrong with your order. The email usually comes with a link for you to click on so that you can get the advertised discount or fix the problem with your order. Clicking the link, however, downloads malware on your computer. To confirm the legitimacy of the sender’s identity, double-check the email address. In addition, be on the lookout for poor spelling and grammar and links that require you to supply your personal information, the e-commerce site Etsy recommends. That’s a way to avoid falling victim to these money scams.

With our ever-expanding dependence on technology, there are bound to be people who try to take advantage of people on the internet. In addition to internet scams and hacks, there are over-the-phone scams that attempt to steal personal information. Below are some tips from the St. Mary’s County Sheriff Office on how to spot potential scams and what to do to avoid coming in contact with them. Do not open or click on links from emails that you do not recognize, even from ones that appear to be businesses or organizations. You should immediately delete them so they are removed from your inbox. This also applies to links received over text messages. A general rule of thumb is to not click links when you aren’t sure where it will take you. Always look for the secure site icon near the URL, otherwise any information you submit there is not secure. Find more info at https://mytrendingstories.com/.