Symptoms of ulcers in horses tips and high quality online shopping? Is your horse receiving the full spectrum of nutrients needed for optimum health and performance? Though we all want to provide our horses the best possible feed and nutrition, sometimes they still experience deficits that cause negative health consequences. Dr. Sarah L. Ralston at Rutgers University said, “Nutrition is frequently implicated as a cause of disease or poor performance of horses,” and deficiencies can result in clinical problems. Here, we’ll learn about vitamin and mineral nutrient deficiencies in horses, what causes them, associated symptoms, and how to resolve deficiencies. But first, what are nutrients and how do horses obtain their daily store?

Should You Give Your Horse Salt or an Electrolyte Supplement? So your horse has been working or sweating hard and needs additional electrolytes. Should you give salt or an electrolyte supplement? Yes! Horses need salt daily and occasionally an electrolyte supplement. Salt is a necessary part of a horse’s everyday diet and should always be available. Ensure your horse receives adequate salt by offering a quality free-choice mineral salt lick like Redmond Rock or by adding Redmond Rock Crushed loose mineral salt into feed. Discover extra information on salt for horses.

Cooling down your horse is crucial in winter. A sweaty horse can easily become chilled in cold or damp weather once exercise is over. Cool your horse slowly by walking at least ten minutes, then dismount and hand-walk your horse for several more minutes before removing the saddle. Make sure to dry your horse thoroughly before putting her back in the paddock/stall or turning her out to feed. Winter exercise burns up more calories, and your horse is already expending a lot of energy just to stay warm. Working in cold weather can also increase your horse’s risk of dehydration, since horses are less interested in drinking during winter months.

Salt and mineral blocks are heat-pressed, manmade licks. Most contain around 90% salt, with 6 to 8 trace minerals added in. So why is a manmade block an inferior choice as a horse salt and mineral supplement? Pressed blocks only contain a fraction (6 to 8) of the full spectrum of trace minerals horses need for optimum health. Horses often resort to chewing blocks to get more mineral quantity. Some contain unnecessary fillers or dyes (like those blue horse blocks). Many contain sweeteners to improve palatability and entice licking. Pressed blocks dissolve quickly in humidity or wet weather.

Keep tubs clean. Horses want fresh, clean water. Clear your horse’s water container of debris and change water frequently. If you’re using a bucket, rinse and wipe it out daily. Troughs and large containers should be cleaned weekly with a bristle brush to clear algae and contaminants. We realize a horse that’s not drinking is an immense concern. That’s why we created Redmond Rein Water. It’s an all-natural equine electrolyte drink mix that stirs easily into a water bucket and appeals to horses’ taste for salt. Discover extra details on https://redmondequine.com/.